Viable solutions for mobility

It is urgent to find viable solutions to the socioeconomic, environmental and health problems presented by urban mobility. A sustainable mobility is necessary, oriented to the citizen and respectful of the environment. In this paper, we present a solution in which the most advanced technology allows the combination of sustainable modes of transport (public transport, electromobility, bicycles, etc.) with the private vehicle (supported by park & ride schemes). An alternative is thus obtained that offers the citizen all the subjective advantages of the private vehicle (flexibility, speed, etc.) together with the additional advantages of sustainability, respect for the environment, optimization of the overall cost of urban mobility, etc. Have a look at this Brook Miller Mobility Blog.

The Mobility Assistance Shuttle provides transportation to eligible, staff and faculty members with documented disabilities. The shuttle provides on-campus rides to specified locations for academic or work-related purposes only. Rides must be scheduled at least 24 hours in advance, and are on a first-come-first-serve basis. Due to high ridership during peak hours, not all requests can be accommodated.

Buses, taxis, subway, train or bicycles are the logical alternatives to replace the private vehicle, accompanied by schemes such as car-sharing, ride-sharing or car-pooling that serve to increase the available options and to encourage users to leave their vehicle in a home – or even, stop considering acquiring it. In this environment, public transport considers how to adapt to the times in which we live is absolutely fundamental, and the fact that many of the companies that carry out this task depend on concessions or municipal licenses leads, naturally, to that the incentives of competitive pressure are not applied in the same way. Why do not you see the Brook Miller Mobility Blog!

Antecedents – Brook Miller Mobility Blog

Transport plays a fundamental role in meeting the objectives of economic competitiveness, social cohesion and sustainable growth in our society. As such, an efficient transport system capable of satisfying the changing mobility patterns and improving the performance of citizens’ movements must be at the base of any progress. Integrated and seamless mobility (‘seamless mobility’) is a key concept to optimize the performance of existing transport infrastructures. So far, the transport and urban mobility sector has been formed by separate organizations for different modes of transport, however, this does not reflect how citizens would want to plan and execute their movements. The complexity of using a wide variety of modes of transport discourages many people from using it. See the Brook Miller Mobility Blog.

In this context, the emergence of more and more companies willing to provide alternatives to traditional mobility is something that is completely logical. many companies weave an increasingly dense network of alternatives, in whose complexity, together with the options of public transport, the user navigates through apps that promote multimodal displacements, such as Citymapper or Moovel.

Thus, the citizen is supported at all times by different technologies that facilitate their interaction with service providers and the city, both in the moments before starting a displacement – planning, reservations, etc. – as during the displacement itself, which in the most general case will combine various modes of transport. The user of the proposed solution thus experiences access to different transport modes and alternatives in an assisted way, receiving at all times the necessary information and access to the different transport services. Mobility is perceived as an urban service in this way, without discriminating between different providers and modes of transport.

Thus, we went from a private vehicle as a practically hegemonic form of transport in most cities, to having a car is simply one of the multimodal, on-demand and shared transport options. From a limited transport offer with few service levels to more choice and more service levels available. From a public transport financed and managed by the public sector to a mixed public-private public transport offer; and from transport systems disconnected and in silos, to connected systems and on-demand that is based on information to generate efficiency.

Three fundamental axes of evolution, as we discussed at the time in the presentation of the report ” Upgrading urban mobility: the challenges of urban mobility ” of which I co-authored intermodality (integration), accessibility ( pool of options available), and energy (propulsion). At that point, I commented on the advances made by companies such as Tesla, the impressive results of the launch of the Model 3 , the evident supremacy of the electric motor in terms of simplicity, reduction of breakdowns and, of course, cleaning, and the strong impact we could expect from a technology such as autonomous vehicle, in a race in which, in addition to the well-known Google, many other manufacturers and actors such as Tesla, Uber, Apple, Fiat Chrysler and many others.

Competition, that fundamental factor that advances technology, and that public transport companies have to take into account: abandon attitudes that consider these issues as unlikely or as science fiction is increasingly fundamental … all those who seek to appeal to skepticism and conservatism in the management based on “cars, buses, trains and trams will not drive alone” should be kicked out in a scenario in which it is calculated as the most likely date for the dissemination of this type of vehicle located in around the year 2020. It is in that circumstance, with an auditorium filled by witness, when the one that appears a person who works in a municipal transport company with an absolutely sectarian attitude and with evident animosity for reasons that I do not understand, allows you to understand how difficult it is tried that any kind of solution to the problem of urban mobility comes from someone like that.

One of those people with whom the maximum “do not feed the troll” stops applying: besides “greeting” the beginning of my intervention with this nonsense (the photo was not even mine), he blatantly lied to me by assigning phrases that I did not I said in no time of the talk (I did not say, as any of the assistants can testify, nor are they consistent with my argument, nor obviously I think) and that he also stubbornly refuses to apologize. Fortunately, in the context of a fantastically well-organized congress and full of constructive, open and positive people, an attitude like that was a real exception. Check out the Brook Miller Mobility Blog.